PRESS RELEASE: The Killing of Quanice Hayes by officer Andrew Hearst

Press Statement    For Immediate Release                             March 22, 2017

Contact: Rev. Dr. LeRoy Haynes, Jr. Rev. Dr. T. Allen Bethel

Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition For Justice and Police Reform

Subject: The Killing of Quanice Hayes by officer Andrew Hearst

 

The Grand Jury decision not to indict Portland Police Officer Andrew Hearst for the killing of 17-year-old teenager Quanice Hayes is like a recorder repeated over and over again especially when it comes to Black Lives.

 

The District Attorney and Grand Juries have never indicted a White Police Officer for killing or using excessive force against a Black person or Latino in the history of the City of Portland.

 

Whether Quanice Hayes was guilty or not of personal robbery it is not the responsibility of the Police Officer to act as Judge or Jury and carry out the sentence.

 

How can you put a bullet through the head of a young teenager on his knees (probably giving up) as well as two additional bullets in his body? We know the PPB is trained to shoot for the center mass, so the shot to the head is inconsistent with training. Furthermore, Officer Hearst has killed before. He shot Merle Hatch in 2013 when Hatch was in mental health crisis and holding a telephone handset.

 

This is why we need stronger, independent oversight of Portland Police Officers in the use of deadly and excessive force.

 

These kinds of shootings and use of excessive force show that the Police cannot Police themselves. Also, they show there is a great need for an independent prosecutor to be appointed in cases dealing with Police shootings and excessive force.

 

In a time when we are dealing with one of the most explosive issues in our City and Nation, namely Police use of deadly and excessive force, the City’s legal team is appealing to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to remove Federal Judge Michael Simon from the Settlement Agreement brought by the Department of Justice and the Albina Ministerial Alliance Coalition (Enhanced Amicus Status) to reform the Portland Police Bureau.

 

Judge Michael Simon is one of the most well respected Judges on the Federal bench for his independence, fairness and jurisprudence. He is well loved by the Citizens of Portland.

 

The fire is flaming even more in the City of Portland by the lack of diversity in the command staff and rank positions within the Portland Police Bureau.

 

Portland wants a progressive, Police community oriented, and a diverse Police Bureau. We want to go “forward” and not “backwards”.

 

Shabbat HaHodesh: Say His Name

This Shabbat carries so much significance – it is Shabbat HaHodesh, the Shabbat of The Month, that is, the first month of the Jewish year, the month in which we will commemorate the Exodus from Egypt. That escape occurred on the 14th day of the month we now call Nisan, and every year we gather to tell the tale. The power, we are taught, is in the words that we share.

And when your children ask you, “What do you mean by this ritual?” you shall tell them, “this is the Passover.” (Ex.12.26-27)

Our Rabbis taught that even those who know the tale well are considered praiseworthy if they tell it at length, this story of how one moves from slavery to freedom. Tell it again, tell it over and over, tell it until it is heard, and recognized.

We are so much in need of that story today. When we retell it, we remind ourselves of the importance of saying what is important out loud. From the beginning of creation, when the first people helped G*d create the world by naming all its creatures, Jewish tradition has understood the great power of speaking truth in words, out loud.

When I visited City Hall on the morning of March 1, I witnessed the power of speaking words directly. A group lifted up the simple chant:

Say his name! Quanice Hayes! Say his name! Quanice Hayes! Say his name! Quanice Hayes! 

No matter how you feel about the tactic of refusing to allow regular city business to proceed as usual by showing up during open city council sessions and disrupting them, it is powerful to realize that a simple, repeated chant cuts right through such attempts to proceed with business as usual.

There is a tremendous power in speaking truth directly. Alas, we also know that there is a great deal of power in refusing to speak what should be spoken, and thus recognized as real and significant.

Our Jewish tradition decries the act of remaining silent when speaking up is the needed moral act, even as it denounces those who speak falsely in order to manipulate the truth to their own advantage. We have a surfeit of the latter, but what do we know about the former? 

For Zion’s sake I wil not be silent, for Jerusalem’s sake I will not be still, until her justice shines like a light, and her help like a burning torch. (Isaiah 62.1)

That chant continues to ring in my ears: Say his name! Quanice Hayes! Say his name! Quanice Hayes! Say his name! Quanice Hayes! 

On this Shabbat HaHodesh, we are called to consider the importance of saying our truth out loud, and supporting the rights of others to that same speech. The words of G*d echo through every person’s truth, even – probably especially – the truths that disturb our peace and quiet. 

And on this Shabbat which is also called VaYakhel-Pekudey, after the Torah parashah that we are reading in the yearly cycle, we cannot but also note that VaYakhel, which means “gathering”, reminds us that words must not only be spoken aloud, but also heard, and witnessed, by the gathered community. Only in such a community of shared meaning and purpose do our words fulfill their purpose: to tell the story, and tell what it means.

Today at 2pm Quanice Hayes will finally be laid to rest – a horribly long time after he was tragically killed. His name joins too long a list of other young African American men killed at the hands of police. To say his name is to insist that we listen, and that we tell that story too, as many times as necessary until we finally discover the way from slavery to freedom for all.

In every generation we are commanded to consider that we ourselves are going out of Egypt. (BT Pesakhim 116b)

Hazak v’nit’hazek, be strong and let us strengthen each other,

Shabbat shalom